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Author Topic: What "IQ" really means...  (Read 1334 times)
Eothr
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« on: January 10, 2013, 07:39:51 PM »

During my studies of psychology, I frequently encountered references to mental testing that determined IQ in children and adults, and something was interesting to me:

IQ stands for "intelligence quotient" and, contrary to popular belief, is not an indicator of how smart you are; rather, it is the measurement by which your mental age is compared to your physical age.

The formula for determining IQ is Mental age x 100
                                                     Physical age

This means that an IQ of 100 is the base average of human intelligence, where the mental and physical ages are the same.

Using myself as an example, with an IQ of 163, my mental age is %63 older than my physical age; so, while I am 24 1/2 years old physically, in my mind I am almost 40!

This is an intriguing aspect of the human mind, and for me a real answer for why I always felt "old" when around my peers in high school. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
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Navarre
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 07:48:17 PM »

My IQ is also in the 160s and, like you, I have often felt old compared to my age-peers. The way I thought about things was very different than those of my age. One of my college professors once remarked to me, when I was about 21, that I acted like someone in their 40's.

But if my IQ is 163 and my physical age is 45, then my mental age must be around 74. No wonder I feel so tired all the time!
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Eothr
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 07:51:18 PM »

Lol, I feel the same way, sometimes. It actually makes me a bit nervous around women who are 18 & 19 yo because it makes me feel like a dirty old codger  Embarrassed
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Gaumer
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 07:54:01 PM »

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57560555/iq-scores-not-accurate-marker-of-intelligence-study-shows/

Recent studies suggest IQ is meaningless.

Probably some dumb angry scientists doing this one though Wink
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Eothr
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2013, 08:00:32 PM »

On some levels, it is.

It doesn't matter whether your IQ is 106 or 160; society accommodates the one who "acts their age".

Where IQ becomes important is when children have below-average to mentally retarded levels of IQ (70-50, below 50 respectively). Determining it early on means that educators can adapt to a special child's needs.

The dark side of that is that children with exceptionally high IQs don't get special treatment, and have to endure being assimilated in with the "average" children.
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Gaumer
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2013, 08:05:08 PM »

On some levels, it is.

It doesn't matter whether your IQ is 106 or 160; society accommodates the one who "acts their age".

Where IQ becomes important is when children have below-average to mentally retarded levels of IQ (70-50, below 50 respectively). Determining it early on means that educators can adapt to a special child's needs.

The dark side of that is that children with exceptionally high IQs don't get special treatment, and have to endure being assimilated in with the "average" children.

Very cool!

That makes a ton of sense.


In regards to the "dark side" comment, I assume you are talking about the public education system?

Surely the availability of the internet helps in this case, but, on the other side of this, isn't it a good thing to have a diverse student body for everyone engaged? I understand an exceptional child falling through cracks and such (I feel school not keeping pace with me lead to many negative issues I had as a youth) but this gap is narrowing is it not?
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Eothr
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 08:14:04 PM »

The gap is narrowing, yes, but not because of the system improving; it's because of less outliers.

More and more children with IQs above 130 (which is the peak of above average) are being homeschooled by parents who believe in enriched education; they aren't really included in the consensus for education statistics. The children with IQs that veer towards average have an easier time adapting to their environment and peers, than the ones with above-average IQs.

This is mostly speculative, but the evidence provides itself, IMO.
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Gaumer
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2013, 08:19:10 PM »

Total homeschooling may help the gap caused by the learning disparities between students, but wouldn't it further compound the underlying problem of the social stigma associated with "exceptional" students?

Its hard to correct a social stereotype if those being stereotyped simply remove themselves from the equation.
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Eothr
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2013, 08:22:37 PM »

Indeed...

I don't have an answer, unfortunately. This situation isn't cut-and-dry, by any measure. A lot of circumstances will have to fall into place before we can see a positive outcome..,
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Gaumer
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2013, 08:30:34 PM »

Yup.

When "no child can be left behind" the focus must be on the bottom of that curve. As a wise man once said, "Its all about the Benjamins".


I see school as more of a social learning experience for my kids. I make them do at least 10 hours a week (when I can) of home learning on the internet and such, and I know that my kid has learned more from Khan Academy, for example, than from many of his school classes.

But I have a buddy who literally cannot read (see what I did there) and made almost 40 grand last year working as a mechanic...so yea, its nowhere near cut and dry Smiley
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Eothr
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2013, 08:54:49 PM »

I applaud your efforts.

I don't have kids of my own, and I probably never will (to my infinite sorrow), so it brings me joy to see when the next generation truly learn and grow.
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2013, 01:59:52 AM »

I see school as more of a social learning experience for my kids. I make them do at least 10 hours a week (when I can) of home learning on the internet and such, and I know that my kid has learned more from Khan Academy, for example, than from many of his school classes.

I live in an area where the majority of classes tend to have a focus on farming, even though only a small portion of the kids attending these schools go on to become farmers or work with the knowledge they are teaching.  The classes are obviously leftovers from years past when the town was smaller and most of the kids were farm kids, but they are almost useless in preparing the rest of the kids for modern jobs.  It has gotten worse since I was in school since they have scaled back to the point where what I was learning in 7th/8th grade around 20 years ago is now what Juniors/Seniors are learning.

Because of things like this, my goddaughter's parents and I have always tried to expand on her learning by giving her home homework of sorts.  On my end it is usually just getting her to read a book (sometimes fiction, sometimes on a subject she might be interested in, etc.) and then talking about it, but it is at least broadening her knowledge more than what the schools here offer. 
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Eothr
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2013, 07:45:13 AM »

Good for you and your goddaughter, truly.

A podcast I no longer listen to highlighted a key point that I believe is a problem in public schools: "Why are we teaching kids useless math? Why isn't there a personal finance class where kids learn to balance a checkbook? Has anyone ever needed to know the 'area under the parabola'?"

I learned the area under a parabola in Algebra; that knowledge hasn't done a damn thing for me in the 10 years since I learned it. Point proven.
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sliksham
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« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2013, 08:27:28 AM »

ironically I use 'area under graph' stuff almost every day, but its swings and roundabouts really I suppose.
My university lecturer told me that I would use about 5% of what I'd learned in my working life, he's not far off.
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Gaumer
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« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2013, 11:15:11 AM »

Good for you and your goddaughter, truly.

A podcast I no longer listen to highlighted a key point that I believe is a problem in public schools: "Why are we teaching kids useless math? Why isn't there a personal finance class where kids learn to balance a checkbook? Has anyone ever needed to know the 'area under the parabola'?"

I learned the area under a parabola in Algebra; that knowledge hasn't done a damn thing for me in the 10 years since I learned it. Point proven.

While I don't disagree with you about learning personal finance management in school is so very important (and not just check book balancing, but budgeting, savings plans, retirement, the shabang) its my opinion that anyone who can muster the energy to understand area under graph shouldn't have a problem with balancing a freaking check book Smiley
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