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Author Topic: Living in Europe  (Read 7658 times)
Gaumer
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« Reply #45 on: January 10, 2011, 01:17:29 PM »

So about the same here? I mean, that attitude towards life is surely not extinct in America.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 01:18:40 PM by Gaumer » Logged

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« Reply #46 on: January 10, 2011, 01:20:10 PM »

I dunno, Gaumer. Most people I know complain for ten minutes and then sum it up by saying, "But I guess it could be worse." as if that justified their negative outlook.

Prices do sound expensive. Fortunately, I am a minimalist.

I would prefer to ride a bicycle to driving a car. Exercise...USA...What?

-10 Celsius is 14 degrees F. Still not too bad. It gets colder than that here.
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #47 on: January 10, 2011, 01:27:08 PM »

There are also people living on welfare as a way of life, remembering the consumption according to the need, but forgetting on contributing according to ability.

That is partially why I can't do anything.  No, I'm not one of those lazy people who live off welfare or anything, but I'm on disability due to really crappy health (most of which stems from complications from cancer/chemo).  But at least I use my money for reasons it SHOULD be used for.  Anything not a requirement (food, medications, doctor bills, etc), I have to find the money another way (babysitting, cleaning, etc), providing I don't need to use that extra cash just to get by (which I often do).  So I can't really move where I want to live because I can't even afford to live where I am right now anyway.  
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« Reply #48 on: January 10, 2011, 01:28:48 PM »

Alisha, would that situation be different if your health care (although not medicines) was free, as it is in Denmark? Would it change your standard of living?
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #49 on: January 10, 2011, 01:37:42 PM »

Alisha, would that situation be different if your health care (although not medicines) was free, as it is in Denmark? Would it change your standard of living?

I don't know, I don't really have a similar situation to compare it to.  It would provide a level of relief on my part due to the many doctors visits I have that are mostly checkups and tests to see how things are.  I have at LEAST one doctor a month, usually more, I have to see spread out through not only my main doctor, but a few specialists because of some of the strange health complications I have.  But my various medications aren't cheap either (My painkiller alone is almost $100 a month WITH the co-pay through my medical aid, and I have several others that are in the upper price range as well).
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Gaumer
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« Reply #50 on: January 10, 2011, 01:41:13 PM »

If your on disability you are on medicare and your healthcare is free, correct?

Wouldn't it be more of a job availability thing, not being able to perform your original occupation because of the disability? I mean, if you can post on a forum you can do data entry.

It a matter of the government changing laws to allow for specific job placement. Taking each person on a case by case basis and fitting job places. Its the same issue with the corrections system in the U.S.
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« Reply #51 on: January 10, 2011, 01:42:38 PM »

It's a matter of the government changing laws to allow for specific job placement. Taking each person on a case by case basis and fitting job places. It's the same issue with the corrections system in the U.S.

Amen, brother.
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #52 on: January 10, 2011, 01:52:07 PM »

If your on disability you are on medicare and your healthcare is free, correct?

Me?  Not free.  Not by a long shot.  I get assistance, but I still have to cover some pretty sizeable bills. 

The thing that drives me mad, though, is I've been in and out of hospitals since I was 4.  There is sufficient evidence I have health problems.  Yet there are people who CAN work living like kings on govt. money while I have to rely on the help of others just to survive.  Don't get me wrong, I am in a somewhat "comfortable" area, but that is mostly because I have different priorities and I'm content to have what I can get instead of getting the best, highest tech TV or a new living room set or eating the best brand-name foods or lobster or whatever. 

Theoretically, it would be easier to live somewhere where I didn't have to pay as much for doctor visits, but I don't know how other things would work out (medications, rent, other bills, etc) in comparison.
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #53 on: January 10, 2011, 03:36:07 PM »

Wouldn't it be more of a job availability thing, not being able to perform your original occupation because of the disability? I mean, if you can post on a forum you can do data entry.

Theoretically, yes.  But I'm on a forum right now while also on some pretty heavy medications that alter my mind (which I hate because it dulls my thinking), away from people and germs (I'm not one of those people with fears, but I do have a severely compromised immune system) and I keep looking at the phone to see if it lights up (I'm nearly deaf) to tell my friend what I want for dinner when she calls because I couldn't make any plans before she left for work because I never know what state I'm going to be in later in the day (some days I'm too nauseous or have too much pain to eat anything more than crackers and a sprite instead of, say, casserole or meat and potatoes).    I'm also trying to work up the strength to bear through the pain to get up and walk to the kitchen to grab a glass of water or a Sprite to take my meds for my heart and my nerves. 

And this is a good day, which is rare.  Some days I'm in so much pain or so nauseous that I can't get out of bed.  Some days I'm too dizzy or my vision is too blurry to even read.  At least twice a month I'm in the emergency room for one reason or another.  I spent about a month and a half in the hospital last year combined (not including Doctor appointments or ER visits) for one reason or another, and that was a "slow year". 

Every time I've worked, I've been fired because my health is so unpredictable and I can't guarantee that I'll be able to work every single day.  I couldn't even keep a job as a volunteer GM in Everquest (no pay, just gives you the game for free without the monthly fees if you worked for 4 hours a week as a GM).  The only things I can do are at-home commission jobs.  I get just over $350 a month disability, and that barely scratches the surface of doctor bills alone, but at least I get that to TRY to make ends meet.  All non-necessities are either gifts (friends buy me books, rent movies, etc), got by babysitting (watching cartoons with 7 - 10 year olds mostly) or washing friends/family/neighbors cars for a few bucks, or otherwise provided (internet and cable paid for by mom, I'm staying with her again).

I'm sure if I lived elsewhere I could find SOMETHING I'd be able to do, be it in Europe or just a larger city.  But even that requires money I don't have just to get there.
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« Reply #54 on: January 13, 2011, 05:06:39 AM »

in europe(belgium) you would get some compensation for the doctor bills, but that is if you are a citizen, and member of a goverment healthcare organization.

If you were considered unable to work, you would get a montly payment like a salary by the goverment. but you would not be allowed to do any paid work or you would lose your income again.

And hospitals would still charge you with hefty bills for staying there, eating there food, using their beds etc... and for those bills you would have to have a private insurance.

for example. I have a friend who has some lungcondition (and has had a lungtransplantation) and diabetes. So he can't really go to work because of risk of infection. He is considered to be partly disabled and get's a montly fee somwhere around 800 euro's. If he would move out from his parents house he would have to pay rent, food, car etc from that money. It is almost umpossible to have a decent life with that money.

If he would go to work, he would lose that money, even if he would only work half time, or did some jobs (i'm talking of official jobs of course, what the goverment doesn't know, the goverment can do anything about.)

luckily he has rich parents who provide for him.

so being really ill suck in every country.
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« Reply #55 on: January 13, 2011, 06:41:44 AM »

I suspect it is difficult for any country to want to give even cost-of-living money every month for decades to citizens who, in turn, cannot contribute to the country's economy. That really is a free hand-out just for being a citizen.

I'm not saying it's not the right thing to do, only that it would be a financial burden to the economy.

A well-thought out work-at-home program subsidized by the government could allow most of the disabled to work. In this era of technology, it is not at all hard to imagine.

The government sets up and trains the individual to do some sort of work for the government or a privatized firm. The employee gets paid and, if they don't do the work, they don't get paid.

Seems fair on all sides to me.
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #56 on: January 17, 2011, 01:02:33 PM »

Actually, in Denmark you would be pretty much taken care of (just for being a citizen). If you due to an accident, you are no longer fit to work in your otherwise chosen profession, you are offered retraining, or if impossible get a 'premature pension' (please cease any filthy thoughts here), which is not golden, but enough to live on. And you get economic aid for medicine and stuff. Although the current right-wing government are cutting some of these kinds of welfare (due to myths of healthy people cheating the system to freeload), most of it is still in place. If you are born with disabilities you are also taken care of.

All of this is expensive to a society - but it is the human thing to do.
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« Reply #57 on: January 17, 2011, 03:48:26 PM »

All of this is expensive to a society - but it is the human thing to do.

And if my limited knowledge of Denmark is correct this is how it is viewed. My understanding is that the taxes in Denmark are outrageously high yet people live reasonably and fairly happily because those taxes are actually used to take care of its citizens unlike wherever most of my tax dollars go.
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Cheesedemon88
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« Reply #58 on: January 17, 2011, 07:19:08 PM »

You asked me about how it is to live in Norway, so here goes;

From what I have heard from GiantGnome Norway is not very different than Denmark, the taxes are a bit lower, but not much, and education and medical care is pretty much free, of course there is a small fee each time you visit the doctor or pick up medicines, but these fees, or induvidual shares, doesn't exceed 1700 kroner each year (about 290 US dollar). Also, stuff (like food, rent, clothes etc) is more expensive than most of the world, but then again if you hold a job with a Norwegian salary it pretty much evens out.

I have lived most of my life in Kristiansand, Norway's 5th largest city, It lies in the south and it's really nice, I also studied in Oslo the capital city one year. Personally I prefer Kristiansand as a city it's a nice place to live and it has a great geek community. That said, I am using the english definition of "city" versus "town" where it is a city if it has a cathedral  Wink even Oslo is really small compared to the cities  in the US or the bigger cities in Europe, as the biggest city it only carries 586 000 people.

Otherwise crime is pretty low in Norway, perhaps except in Oslo where drug dealings has become a large problem, that said, an armed robbery in a convenient store reaches the national news.

Anyway, that's the short of it feel free to ask if you have any specific questions Smiley
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« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2011, 07:33:36 PM »

Does Norway have the same attitude toward relationships, marriage, sexuality, and religion as Denmark?

How is the weather there? I hate cold weather but everywhere that interests me is in a region seemingly less temperate than my own.
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