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Author Topic: Living in Europe  (Read 7320 times)
Navarre
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« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2011, 09:25:52 AM »

Scooby-Doo was a great Dane as well.

But if I can't live in Denmark with the name Hamlet then my son, Scooby, is really S.O.L.
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2011, 10:17:43 AM »

The crown prince & princess just had twins. A boy and a girl. Maybe the boy should be named Hamlet? The polls now are showing support for him to be named Elvis, seeing as they were born on The King's (that other sorta king) birthday.

Oh another thing. That whole separation between church and state? We don't do that Smiley
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Navarre
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« Reply #32 on: January 10, 2011, 10:20:27 AM »

What if I am atheist? Will that be a problem for me in terms of acceptance? Lynch mobs with pitchforks and torches assaulting my castle, any of that kind of thing?
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2011, 10:51:50 AM »

You certainly won't have any problem being atheist!

No separation between church and state is a truth with modifications; We have a state church, but the only person forced to be a member is the Monarch (The Queen, at this point).

Actually I think that the presence of a state church has led to less 'competition' between rival churces, and thus the church has had no reason to promote itself - and thus we have more atheists. The State church is for most ethnic danes just a tradition. I am an atheist, but I still choose to pay church tax, mainly because of the cultural side of it.

No one will lynch you for being atheist, many will agree, and those who disagree will keep their mouth shut - or take a discussion. Only Mormons and Jehovas Witnesses will knock on your door sometimes, and that is rare.

And about the whole citizen thing. I agree that you should aspire to be a citizen of where you live - just the whole taxation and representation thing alone speaks for it. But Denmark specifically do not allow dual-citizenship. You probably have to burn the Stars and Stripes and choke a bald eagle to death before being sworn in as a loyal subject of The Queen.
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Navarre
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« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2011, 11:00:42 AM »

Well, like Gaumer said, I'd have to live there for quite some time to see if it is where I would wish to spend the remainder of my life. But so far it still sounds quite right for me in many ways.

Do they play D&D in Denmark?  Wink
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2011, 11:02:38 AM »

We do indeed. I had found a (albeit small) group before moving. But you may have to settle for Pathfinder Wink
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Navarre
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« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2011, 11:04:25 AM »

I hear Pathfinder is like an improved version of 3.5 so that's perfect.

What are the prevalent martial arts styles around there?
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2011, 11:17:43 AM »

What are the prevalent martial arts styles around there?

Sociology? (Now THAT is an obscure reference!)
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Navarre
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« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2011, 11:50:41 AM »

heh Yeah, you lost me on that.

But, regardless of the martial arts system, it still comes down to the individual school. So that's something I'd have to discover on my own anyway.

What about the general attitude toward things like dating, sexual relations, marriage, children, etc?
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #39 on: January 10, 2011, 12:10:53 PM »

heh Yeah, you lost me on that.

But, regardless of the martial arts system, it still comes down to the individual school. So that's something I'd have to discover on my own anyway.

What about the general attitude toward things like dating, sexual relations, marriage, children, etc?

Didn't think that a Bordieu reference would fly Smiley

What is this thing 'dating', of which you speak? Seriously, I am a single overweight geek who reads comic and plays D&D, I would not know of these things. When I did have a relationship, it started out as a one-nighter and developed from there into dating, then into living together, then into screaming at each other, which I think is pretty normal.

What I have learned from american teen soaps, the dating structure is less set in stone. I think you could get away with going dutch on dates, but I think the trend (originating with you 'mericans) is that the guy pays, at least on the first couple of dates. Unless you go for progressive women, where you will have to ask to pay for the first round as an 'ironic' gesture, and then accept that she pays for the next.

Having casual sex with strangers is mostly not frowned upon, unless you flaunt it. Living together and having children without marriage is not uncommon. I actually think that you are expected to live together for a few years before getting married.  Two kids are the norm. Being from a 'broken home' does not stigmatise you one bit, some places living with both parents is probably considered weird Smiley

Keep in mind that this is based on my experiences living in Copenhagen, which may be more progressive than, say, the windy west coast of Jutland.
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Navarre
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« Reply #40 on: January 10, 2011, 12:45:27 PM »

It still sounds right to me so far. I'm still looking for the downside. Must be something I wouldn't like, right?
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #41 on: January 10, 2011, 12:58:07 PM »

It still sounds right to me so far. I'm still looking for the downside. Must be something I wouldn't like, right?

I think people being too happy would make me grumpier, or at least overly suspicious.  But that is more a case of what I'm used to than anything wrong with them.  Maybe the weather isn't suitable to your tastes?
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I never make stupid mistakes. Only very, very clever ones.   -The Doctor
Navarre
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« Reply #42 on: January 10, 2011, 01:00:30 PM »

I was worried about the weather. But GiantGnome said the winter was around 10 degrees Celsius. That's still above freezing. I was imagining six foot high snow drifts everywhere.

I'm okay with happy people. The fear-laden negativity of the U.S. is one of the things driving me away from it.
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Alisha Mynx
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« Reply #43 on: January 10, 2011, 01:08:02 PM »

I'm okay with happy people. The fear-laden negativity of the U.S. is one of the things driving me away from it.

I don't like the negativity either, but I do get a little crazy when I'm surrounded by constantly extremely happy people.  I think I've watched too many crazy movies where the happy people end up being robots or aliens. 
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I never make stupid mistakes. Only very, very clever ones.   -The Doctor
GiantGnome
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« Reply #44 on: January 10, 2011, 01:15:16 PM »

I was worried about the weather. But GiantGnome said the winter was around 10 degrees Celsius. That's still above freezing. I was imagining six foot high snow drifts everywhere.

I'm okay with happy people. The fear-laden negativity of the U.S. is one of the things driving me away from it.

10 degrees Celsius below zero, as in -10 degrees Celsius. Did I mess that up?

And the happy doesn't shine through all the time. It's not weird ass smiling-all-the-time-happy. It's more like a "When all is said and done, I have a pretty decent life going on"-kinda happy, I would reckon

The downside to the society is general to most welfare state. People can be reluctant do to stuff themselves, relying on the government. When it snows, many doesn't even clear their part of the sidewalk, although required to do so by law - or indeed liability for people falling and hurting themselves. There are also people living on welfare as a way of life, remembering the consumption according to the need, but forgetting on contributing according to ability.

Also the price of goods in general. A pair of Converse Allstars costs 150% more in Copenhagen, than they do on manhattan. Why? Other than a 25% VAT, because people are willing to pay that much. Also, cars have a 180% import tax and gasoline costs about 2$ a litre (someone please convert it to $/gallon, as I can't be bothered). That, and expensive parking, is the main reason why most people in Copenhagen ride their bike or take public transport.
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