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Author Topic: Living in Europe  (Read 7311 times)
Navarre
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« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2011, 04:13:29 PM »

I am currently in the same time zone as all of my clients. A couple of years from now I expect to be an hour behind all of them.

That seems fine because although I'll get up an hour earlier that's still only 7 am but I'll be done with work by 3-4 pm everyday (on my new time zone). That will seem like more free time for me.

But I have a friend in South Korea who is thirteen hours ahead of me. That doesn't make for a feasible work schedule.

I don't know right off what, say, Denmark is to the Eastern Time Zone.
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greyman24
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« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2011, 07:51:03 PM »

6 hours. I'm in Central, and I work with a woman in The Netherlands. It's a 7 hour difference.
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Navarre
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« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2011, 07:59:53 PM »

So I need to be up by 2 am but only work until 10-11 am?
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2011, 10:47:00 PM »

So I need to be up by 2 am but only work until 10-11 am?

Other way around. You can sleep 'till 2 pm and work until late night. As the sun rises in the east, Denmark (and europe) is ahead.

Being a Dane myself, I would certainly recommend Denmark as a place of living, although it is not without it's flaws. Ethnic danes are really kinda "ethnocentric" *cough*racist*cough*, but as long as you're polite (and *cough*white*cough*), most will respond in kind.

Education is paid for all the way to the Master, and earning a PhD is a hard-to-get job. You get automatic scolarship lasting for the expected duration of your education of choice +1 year for unforeseen circumstances. If you need more than that, you can get a cheap loan for another year's worth.

Unemployment is ok (if you've had a job and paid dues to an 'a-kasse' (sorta unemployment insurance), it is excellent), healthcare is free (although not dental, for some reason). Medicine is not free, however, so some health insurance is recommended.

This is the wellfare situation as seen from the citizens point of view, I would not know about immigrants with or without a permanent stay-and-work-visa. Of course, if you are serious, I could check into this for you.

Thanks to global change, summers are getting warmer here, but winters are also getting rougher. Due to the islandish nature of the country, you are never far from a beach. Topless/nude sunbathing is allowed, but thanks to people becoming more pervish about this, the trend is downgoing.

American comics (in the floppies) in Copenhagen are usually about a week behind, probably more in the rest of the country. Only one shop have single-issues. Comic-book-stores with trades only are more plentiful.

That was what I just could think of, feel free to ask specific questions Smiley
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greyman24
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2011, 06:24:23 AM »

So, let me ask you this.

How often to people call you an "incestuous, murd'rous, damned Dane" and ask you to "drink of this potion"?

Just curious.
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Navarre
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« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2011, 06:50:38 AM »

Other way around. You can sleep 'till 2 pm and work until late night. As the sun rises in the east, Denmark (and europe) is ahead.

So if I work here from 8 am to 5 pm I need to work there from 3 pm to midnight? ... Doesn't sound too bad.

Being a Dane myself, I would certainly recommend Denmark as a place of living, although it is not without it's flaws. Ethnic danes are really kinda "ethnocentric" *cough*racist*cough*, but as long as you're polite (and *cough*white*cough*), most will respond in kind.

I am very polite and very, very white. However, I want to live in a place where the people are geneally tolerant of others despite such things. Is that a problem?

Education is paid for all the way to the Master, and earning a PhD is a hard-to-get job. You get automatic scolarship lasting for the expected duration of your education of choice +1 year for unforeseen circumstances. If you need more than that, you can get a cheap loan for another year's worth.

I already have a Master's degree plus, Education certificates for grades 5-university, and a minor. I'm fine.

Unemployment is ok (if you've had a job and paid dues to an 'a-kasse' (sorta unemployment insurance), it is excellent), healthcare is free (although not dental, for some reason). Medicine is not free, however, so some health insurance is recommended.

I own my own company so this may not be a huge issue. But I have not been able to afford private health insurance for myself. So Denmark would give me a step up right away.

This is the wellfare situation as seen from the citizens point of view, I would not know about immigrants with or without a permanent stay-and-work-visa. Of course, if you are serious, I could check into this for you.

Might be.

Thanks to global change, summers are getting warmer here, but winters are also getting rougher. Due to the islandish nature of the country, you are never far from a beach. Topless/nude sunbathing is allowed, but thanks to people becoming more pervish about this, the trend is downgoing.

Any place where the weather is warm and the people are nude would be high on my list of places to live.

American comics (in the floppies) in Copenhagen are usually about a week behind, probably more in the rest of the country. Only one shop have single-issues. Comic-book-stores with trades only are more plentiful.

I haven't read a new comic in months so I wouldn't notice too much difference. As long as major titles can be bought, I'm cool.

So far, it sounds pretty good but I'd like to hear more.

So tell me a little more about the ethnocentric attitude and weather.
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2011, 06:51:09 AM »

So, let me ask you this.

How often to people call you an "incestuous, murd'rous, damned Dane" and ask you to "drink of this potion"?

Just curious.

Actually, it happens surprisingly rarely, these days. Probably due to the low number of princes being named Hamlet.
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Navarre
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« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2011, 06:52:37 AM »

So, let me ask you this.

How often to people call you an "incestuous, murd'rous, damned Dane" and ask you to "drink of this potion"?

Just curious.

Actually, it happens surprisingly rarely, these days. Probably due to the low number of princes being named Hamlet.

So my real name being Hamlet could be problematic for me? Hmm...I'll have to rethink this.
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GiantGnome
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« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2011, 07:30:38 AM »

Other way around. You can sleep 'till 2 pm and work until late night. As the sun rises in the east, Denmark (and europe) is ahead.

So if I work here from 8 am to 5 pm I need to work there from 3 pm to midnight? ... Doesn't sound too bad.

Being a Dane myself, I would certainly recommend Denmark as a place of living, although it is not without it's flaws. Ethnic danes are really kinda "ethnocentric" *cough*racist*cough*, but as long as you're polite (and *cough*white*cough*), most will respond in kind.

I am very polite and very, very white. However, I want to live in a place where the people are generally tolerant of others despite such things. Is that a problem?
Education is paid for all the way to the Master, and earning a PhD is a hard-to-get job. You get automatic scolarship lasting for the expected duration of your education of choice +1 year for unforeseen circumstances. If you need more than that, you can get a cheap loan for another year's worth.

I already have a Master's degree plus, Education certificates for grades 5-university, and a minor. I'm fine.

Unemployment is ok (if you've had a job and paid dues to an 'a-kasse' (sorta unemployment insurance), it is excellent), healthcare is free (although not dental, for some reason). Medicine is not free, however, so some health insurance is recommended.

I own my own company so this may not be a huge issue. But I have not been able to afford private health insurance for myself. So Denmark would give me a step up right away.

This is the wellfare situation as seen from the citizens point of view, I would not know about immigrants with or without a permanent stay-and-work-visa. Of course, if you are serious, I could check into this for you.

Might be.

Thanks to global change, summers are getting warmer here, but winters are also getting rougher. Due to the islandish nature of the country, you are never far from a beach. Topless/nude sunbathing is allowed, but thanks to people becoming more pervish about this, the trend is downgoing.

Any place where the weather is warm and the people are nude would be high on my list of places to live.

American comics (in the floppies) in Copenhagen are usually about a week behind, probably more in the rest of the country. Only one shop have single-issues. Comic-book-stores with trades only are more plentiful.

I haven't read a new comic in months so I wouldn't notice too much difference. As long as major titles can be bought, I'm cool.

So far, it sounds pretty good but I'd like to hear more.

So tell me a little more about the ethnocentric attitude and weather.

The ethnocentricity is a hard thing to talk about. People, in general, are very tolerant towards all people, no matter sexual alignment, nationality, politics and even skin-colour for the most part.

The reason for me mentioning racism, is a relatively new trend of a xenophobic political party (Dansk Folkeparti, The Danish People's Party), which is very skeptical and frightened of especially muslim immigration. They have been gaining support, but now seems to stagnate at about 10-15 percent of the votes at national elections. They have managed, however, to make the general tone in the debate very harsh, and more mainstream parties have taken policies to heart, that never would have been talked about fifteen years ago. It also is found in the way people speak of (muslim) immigrants. Groups are identified as "Third generation immigrant", even though they (and their parents) are danish citizens. Of course, the policies are directed towards all people, not just muslims, so they are not straight up racist, but their intent is rather clear. If people suspect you of being a radical muslim, they will be a bit stiff towards you. No establishment (other than maybe the odd disco with a ignorant bouncer) will refuse you service, though.

Other than a fear towards muslims, danes can seemed rather closed off to outsiders, and thus people can feel not welcome. The american tradition of the omnipresent "How are you", you won't find much. You have to take the initiative to be included in communities. I have just moved to Lolland, a smaller island south of Sealand. I have exchanged hellos with my neighbours, but have still not managed to learn their names (this can, however, be a personal problem). But once you get under people's skin, most are warm and including and excited to hear about you.

On a good summer day, temperatures will be between 25 and 30 degrees C, sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less. There can, though, be weeks of rain - often coinciding with some of the major music festivals Smiley. Winters in general don't go much below freezing, although this and the last winter have been a little more rough, temperatures going under 10 degrees C. But some common sense, some warm clothes and a shovel in the trunk will get you far.

You should be aware that working visas are not necessarily easy to come by, but that is the case in most countries - I, myself, have considered working in the US for a while, but have dropped the idea again, because of difficulties getting a visa.
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Navarre
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« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2011, 07:57:10 AM »

There is plenty of prejudice against Muslims here as well. Despite the rights of all citizens, they are still met with more than their fair share of scrutiny and condemnation.

Mostly, people like to talk behind their backs, the same way they do with black or gay people. At least Denmark seems to be honest in their prejudice. I'd rather live with that than the hypocrisy.

The weather doesn't sound too terribly bad. In fact the winter sounds rather mild. The summer isn't too hot but, really, if your 23 Celsius feels as good as my 73 Fahrenheit, I have no complaints.

As far as the work visa, would it be better to simply become a citizen of Denmark? Why live your life in a country of your choosing and not be a citizen?
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Gaumer
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« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2011, 08:10:58 AM »

Work visa would prolly be the first step to citizenship. I doubt they would let one become a citizen if they weren't proven to be productive.

And its not so silent a hate of Muslims here in America. The NYC mosque got some static but there were plenty of mosques planned for building that got plenty of public static from haters and narrow-minded no nothings all over the place.

I'm a firm believer of the grass is greener because that's where the dogs are shitting. Meaning, it always seems to look better somewhere else than where you are currently. Its all perspective Smiley
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Extremes are always wrong.
Navarre
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« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2011, 08:15:28 AM »

I think people find the grass greener only if they are not taking a realistic assessment of both sides.

I know what it is like to live in the USA. My perspective on that is valid.

I cannot compare it to any other place with validity because I have not had the experience of living in any other place. But that is why I am gathering preliminary information so I can make a reasonable conclusion on the place I am most interested in living for the sake of comparison.

If the new place proves to be better for me then that's good. If not then I now know that and can make an objective decision on whether I prefer the USA more than I thought or if I should continue looking.

So it is both perspective and experience, combined with reason and objectivity.
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Gaumer
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« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2011, 08:17:53 AM »

True.

But in your last post you were ready to become a citizen without even taking any sort of time working and living there. That's what I was commenting off of.
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Navarre
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« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2011, 08:38:52 AM »

oh, no. That would be silly.

Geez, I don't hate America and am so desperate to leave I would run off to the first place with nude beaches (although that's a plus  Smiley ).

I was only meaning to ask if it would be smarter in the long-run to be a citizen than only have a work visa. But your statement earlier about that is a good answer.
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greyman24
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« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2011, 09:24:24 AM »

Actually, it happens surprisingly rarely, these days. Probably due to the low number of princes being named Hamlet.

That is a crying shame. And Hamlet is such a great Danish name!
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